Questing “a Cranny”

I purchased online, Elder John Crandall of RI and His Descendants, over ten years ago for my brother as a gift.  Recently from Denise, who is someone I hope to one day count as a Crandall cousin, I learned the book has more than doubled in price.  Fortunately, Denise is able to work from a digitized version of this manuscript obtained from one of her own “new” Crandall cousins.  I, too, am lucky because frustrated with failed attempts to attach our family’s John to Elder John, my brother returned my/his gift (to me!)

You might recall from a previous post that I seek clues as to the origin of my gggg-grandfather who was named John. I’ve managed to locate 4 possible “crannies” in Elder John’s family tree where my John Crandall who married Elisabeth Pratt in 1772 might fit but I need verification.  Perhaps you can be of assistance.

First, on page 10, I find #18 Col. John Crandall who married Mary (Crandall).  They had a son Jonathan born in 1732. H-mmm, a Jonathan Crandall is listed in Dighton’s 1790 census. My gggg-grandmother Elizabeth Pratt was christened there in 1737.  Also in Dighton, she married a John Crandall in 1772.  Both events were duly recorded in town record.  Might Jonathan son of #18 Col. John be my John who married Elisabeth? Is he also Jonathan Crandall of the 1790 Dighton census?  Might they all be one in the same person?  If so, we have a match!

Preferring to always maintain a backup, I read on to page 27 and encounter #87 John Crandall, son of Samuel and Mary Wilbur, born in 1713 and married to Millicent Chase before 1737. Although Samuel was John and Millicent’s only recorded child and was born in 1735, the author notes there were “probably others.”  Perhaps this cranny is a more secure “fit” for my John?

If not, flipping back to page 23, I find a third possibility.  Listed below #63 John Crandall who is John of Hopkinton RI born in 1705, I discover the following children were born:

1. #198 Eber, 1731

2. #199 Nathan, 1732

3. John

4. Annie who married in 1772 (same year as my John and Elisabeth Pratt).

5. #200 Asahel

6. #201 Samuel

Focusing upon John, the third child, I wonder if perhaps he is my gggg-grandfather who may have relocated to Dighton by 1772 to be with Elisabeth Pratt who was living in her hometown.  Maybe they married and enjoyed a brief season of domestic bliss before John entered military service.  Why is this?  Consulting a different source, I find on page 77 of Soldiers and Sailors, both John Crandel and John Crandol from Dighton served in the War of the Revolution.  If by chance one of these patriots were my gggg-grandfather and if he prematurely died before his father or for some other reason went unmentioned in his father’s will of 1793/5, more is the pity.  Not only did he, Nathan, Annie, and the two youngest sons belonging to #63 John Crandall apparently miss out on a bit of inheritance, I, in turn, missed out on learning more about my gggg-grandfather.  Drat!

The final opportunity I have to cling to Elder John’s tree is Samuel Crandall’s son #136 John on page 17 and page 37. Here I read that #136 John Crandall might have married “Betty/Betsey Fields?”  Since the author indicates in his choice of punctuation his own lack of certainty regarding the spouse’s name, perhaps #136 John Crandall married, in truth, Elisabeth Pratt!

I can only hope to prove one of these facts or situations outlined above.  I will deeply appreciate any and all assistance from any and every one who has a clue as to the origin of my gggg-grandfather whose son, incidentally, John Crandall in 1801 married Phebe Freeman.  And guess where this couple, my ggg-grandparents, were married?  In Dighton, Bristol County, Massachusetts?  Bingo!

 

 

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